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think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
. >> this will be the last one. [inaudible] new york city i'm actually very happy about the discharge petition. it's already exceed my expectations in the speed of which our members being here only a limited amount of time this week were able to snand line and stand the petition. the fact is that it's about getting people to sign. it's also about bringing pressure on the leadership to say why are you not bringing this to the floor. is this a forever protection of the wealthiest people in our country at the expense of the middle class. this decoupling is strat to solving our fiscal challenge that we have now. don't you wonder yourself why the american people almost 100%, i've never seen a poll that says 100%,over whemingly support. this democrats and republicans support. the senate passed it, the president is poised to sign it. why would they block that except to protect the high end? >> we'll take one more. >> [inaudible] did you have any concern about increased debt over to the executive branch. >> my understanding is they are talking about the mcconnell rule which is the president would send his proposal
conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
in places you'd expect; new york, london, frankfurt, tokyo, with a couple of really interesting outliers. and in the outliers was a lot of my story, places like ashford, virginia, where if you ask the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with, they would say, oh, new york, london, los angeles, ashburn, not as if it were this tiny suburb. so it's a surprisingly short list of places that are by far the hot spots, the kind of supernodes on the internet. >> host: what did these supernodes look like, mr. blum, when you visit them? >> guest: well, from the outside, they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. they are quite generic from the outside, deliberately so. they try to hide in plain sight, at least when you're driving by them. inside some of them are in, um, are in old kind of art deco buildings that used to belong to western union or old telecom palaces. others are kind of, have what their operators like to call a cyberific look, kind of the aesthetic adjective of choice, meaning they kind of look like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate.
new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of albany this week and on c-span2 and c-span3. first, a fema and hud on the ongoing recovery from the storm. the centers from york and new jersey will speak out the storm impacted their states. -- the senators from new york and new jersey bespeak about how the storm impacted their states. this could be triggered in january of next year. our guest is robert levenson. then a roundtable discussion on house we castration -- house sequestration can affect the budget policy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our gallery dedicated to the
these discussions to the american people and i look forward to hearing from my friend from new york and what he has to say. we have talked about time and again about the importance of what we are trying to accomplish in this house in protecting the medicare program. i represent a district that has 135,000 medicare beneficiaries. it's actually the fourth most medicare beneficiaries of any congressional district in the country. so the people that i represent have a strong interest, as does every member of this house in making sure that medicare is preserved, it's protected and strengthened and it's always going to be be there, not just for the 135,000 beneficiaries that participate in the medicare program today, but for generations to come. and we aren't going to stand here as democrats or republicans or any political affiliation and say that everything is working perfectly and nothing needs to be altered. the fact is with regard to medicare that 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare, 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare today use every penny that they have paid into the system over the co
. >> he was stolen from a street in new york city and now thanks to good samaritans the dog is back home. >> whoa! >>> there goes santa! look at that. >> this sad, an alabama fan, a hat, and tickets to the bcs title game. >> we're going to the game! ♪ >>> welcome to cbs this morning. we begin with this powerful storm system that caused a string of tornadoes that damaged buildings and knocked out hour in places like louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. it dropped heavy snow in parts of texas, oklahoma, and arkansas. >> it's blamed for three deaths and we'll check the forecast but we begin in hard hit mobile alabama where blake brown of our cbs affiliate is watching the tornado damage blake, good morning. >>> good morning this is the scene here in mobile, we have big trees down powerlines down, roof damage and it is just hours after the storm ripped through the city. >> volatile conditions as tornadoes toucheddown around mobile. >> i was screams and hollaring, and i was just scared to death. >> we ran into the cooler, got all of the employees in the cooler, and it cam
the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois, for example, new york state and california, you see a very different policy mix. which direction are they going? >> their policy mixes to mirror what's happening in washington, which is do not address any of your structural spending problems and need to add spending and ask your taxpayers in particular to-- the wealthier taxpayers to contribute more to that and it's a tax and spend policy. one of the problems that the states have, obviously it's not helping their economic growth and you're beginning to see a huge contrast on the ground between the economic situations of states that are reforming, and those that are not. >> paul: give us a couple of examples, kim, where is growth occurring where you're seeing it. the jobless rate, for example, in illinois the last time i checked was 8.8%. >> yes. >> paul: and meanwhile, wisconsin 6.9%, very interesting contrast. >> look at indiana, where it's also low, and-- yeah, north dakota, which by the way, steve mentioned you know, the fracking boom going up there. and i think it's below 5%, it's astonis
. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democrat leader, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for three minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i request permission to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. clyburn: i thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, when the so-called supercommittee failed last year to overcome the obstruction of the tea party republicans and their leader, grover norquist, to achieve a fair and balanced plan for deficit reduction, economic growth, and job creation it would take a decisive national election to settle the matter. i believe president obama's victory on november 6 was very decisive and pretty definitive. during the campaign president obama very clearly laid out his vision and the american people strongly affirmed his position. the president won all but one of the swing states. 62% of the electoral college, and carried the popular vote by more than 4.
to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker, and i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for as much time as she wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 134, introduced by my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. dold. house resolution 134 condemns the iranian regime's persecution of iran's baha'i minority. baha'i are the largest non-muslim population in iran, numbering over 300,000 members in iran alone. mr. speaker, this resolution marks the 12th congressional action urging the iranian regime to end its persecution of the baha
expect, new york, london and frankfurt and tokyo within interesting outlier and the outliers were a lot of my story places like ashburn virginia in unincorporated suburb where if you ask internet people in the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with what are the capitals of the internet they would say new york london los angeles and ashford. those are the places, the short list of places that are by far the hotspots, super nose on the global internet. >> host: would have the super nose look like mr. blum when you look at them? >> guest: from the outside they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. there are quite generic from the outside. they try to hide in plain sight as you are driving by them. some of them are art deco buildings that used to belong to western western union or telecom palaces. others are kind of from operators like to call it cyber stickler, cyber stick an adjective of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to
. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: thank you very much. the gentlewoman makes a number of good points -- points. we did pass in the house the violence against women act that passed may 16 of this year, 222-205. the house has passed, by the way, 256 of our colleagues to 171 what's tchailed job protection recession prevention act and it was passed on august -- ms. slaughter: will the gentleman yield? mr. sessions: i will in a second. it would have extended all current rates and compelled congress to enact meaningful tax reform in 2013. we passed this. we said we ought to do what we should do. and that was back in august and i would yield to the gentlewoman. ms. slaughter: thank you, mr. sessions. i know you, i know tt you understand, i've talked about thisbut that bill that passed this house excluded a large number of the women basically what this house said with that vote was go ahead and beat them up. we don't want them covered. after the election, after what everybody has been through after what the american plic thinks abo
in the new york times showing they feel he is dragging his feet and waiting until january 3. i also understand that the chairman of the government oversight and reform committee darrell issa, which is from our district here, is holding up the vote on the women against violence act also, which involves the illegals, native americans, and lgbt. this is a coal in the christmas stocking for women who helped to get president obama reelected, and is an attack on medicaid for women that have children, and seniors and -- host: we will leave it there. thanks for calling. olean is in tennessee, republican -- leeann. caller: we need to have more cuts. look at all the thousands obama has put on the payroll. we have 109 million government workers. 49 million people on food stamps whole. them with a free cell phone that has been given to them. if he cannot find any place to cut anything, how about 16,000 block that he's putting on disability. $16,000.ws and dollar host: where did you get that figure? caller: the pennsylvania department of public welfare was talking about how people on welfare are
good friend from rochester new york, the distinguished ranking minority member of the committee on rules, ms. slaughter. pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. dreier: all time will be yielded for debate purposes only. i would like to ask, mr. speaker, unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i was just thinking about the fact that there are 26 letters in the alphabet, and we have had the first three letters used in discussion here on the house floor today. a, b, and my friend from worcester brought up the letter c in talking about this. we have what is so-called letter b. and i'm not doing a "sesame street" skit here. letter b is what we are talking about, plan b, and i think about plan a. plan a is what the majority in the house of representatives has been trying for the last two years to implement
the democratic coalition is dominant, illinois for example, new york state and california you can see a very different policy mix. which direction are they going? >> their policy mix is to mirror what is happening in washington. do not address any of the structural spending problems. continue to add spending and then ask your taxpayers, the healthier of the taxpayers to contribute more money.-- one of the problems these states have is obviously it is not helping their economic growth, and you are beginning to see a huge contrast on the ground between the economic situations of states that are reforming and some that are not. >> where is the growth occurring and where you arel: seeing it?h the jobless rate in illinois last time i checked was 8.8%. wisconsin was 6.9%. very interesting contrast. >> indiana where it is also low. north dakota which steve mentioned the fracking boom, it is below 5%. it is astonishing. >> it is 3%. >> so what about steve where do you think this is going? we are going to see now over the next two, three, four years. >> n ao doubt about it. >> what laboratories work
about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think of the saleogle's is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates wit
the people in new jersey and new york are not left high and drive. because it's a national issue. when there's an emergency, we just don't all say, everybody on their own. which is often your theory. no, everybody in this country isn't always on their own. we are a national community. and when there's a tragedy, when there's some kind of event in new jersey, new york, we all have a responsibility, accountability. don't use that as a dodge for saying, let's act. the auto industry would have been on its -- just destroyed. >> about 1.5 million jobs, i might add. >> absolutely. and we had accountability there. >> let me get a word in here. i know you want to dominate the conversation -- >> no, i want you to get to the point. >> we now agree there should be additional language in the legislation to have accountability. that is a great point. so far there wasn't that accountability when you voted in the past on a bailout to states in this area. it's good that we moved that point. i look forward to working with you to provide that accountability. >> there was accountability in terms of help for gm
about jefferson to give you two sides of him very quickly. matthew davis, an office seeker from new york goes to monticello to fit in the city even now, travels to lobby for the job, he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much a loyalist as we know. i should quickly add one of these i say to my hamiltonian friends is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] among the founders to have sent e-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinki
airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of high speed passenger rail has tried and failed to solve the problems it was intended to solve. these plans were almost always preceded by funding cuts, system i can safety and reliability problems caused a great deal of upheaval in the transportation and forced countries to renational lies a system. with that being said, we think that amtrak's long-term next general plan for the northeast corridor provides a temp plate for a public private partnership that is worth discussing. if the partnership does not reduce the public intere
of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once you jump over the cliff, you can reverse the payroll tax. senator corker who is terrific and had good privilege of talking with him this weekend, we both know you can't reverse amt. once you go over the cliff, amt is insidious. it's hard to figure out. >> in terms of negotiations we will sit here day after day, is it more theatrics, are they really stalled, will we get down to something at the end of the day
and they will run the republicans out. host: here's a headline from the new york post. i want to read you a little bit on that subject from the new york times. that is from the new york times today. stephen from indiana is next on our independent line. good morning. caller: good morning. i will tell you, these breaks did not help when they started in. 2000 or in. how come is a point to hurt so bad when they removed them? we are talking $10 or $20 a week. everybody acts like it's thousands of dollars. so much money can help everybody out. itlet it expire. we have debts from the two wars and that's why we are in debt. that's my opinion. thank you. on twitter -- on wall street journal article. you can read more that in today's wall street journal. i want to bring in jim from franklin, tennessee, on the republican line. caller: thank you. i appreciate your taking my call today. i have been listening very closely to c-span for a long time. i particularly listen to what the democrats are saying, because i am always trying to figure out what they want. i boiled it down to four things. they want to tax mo
washington. we study washington and new york town. we study washington's dashing crossing of the delaware on christmas night which saved the revolution. but who were george washington girlfriends? you find that they teenage washington on more than one occasion goes back home in tears because he was turned down and writes roses are red violets are blue type of poems. he once wrote that at dart has been shot through my heart when yet another girl turned it down so this is another other work at -- a different look at washington. my professors didn't tell me about washington and the teenage girlfriends. i think it provides us with an important lens, new way of understanding the presidents. we all know that our country's leaders have oftentimes been shaped by the hand of a woman, often a mother, often a wife but i'm here to tell you sometimes business as well. is in the news today as we tape this program, general david petraeus is still dominating the headlines with his alleged affair and this behavior. relating to the book, what my first thought was when this happened when it came out was, du
, a office seeker from new york, goes to monticello trying to get an appointment. he was, would have fit right in this city even now. travels to lobby for the job. he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much. one of the things i say to my hamill tone yang guys is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] so, and of all the founders, the most likely to have sent shirtless e-mails is alexander hamilton. [laughter] want to get that on the record, and then we'll move on. matthew davis is sitting there pleading his case, and jefferson's looking sort of -- listening in that vaguely charming way he had. you could leave, and everyone who left his company thought he agrueled with them which was -- agreed with them which was a wonderful way to get through the moment, not such a agreement way to get through the day. and there's a fly buzzing around. and jefferson's nodding and nodding and is in eye contact with davis and goes -- grabs the fly and begins pulling it apart. [laughter] davis begins to realize this payment work out quite as well -- this may not work out quite as well as h
the history of new york city, albany. next, a discussion on the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff on unemployment insurance. then a forum on skilled immigrant labor and the american economy. after that, speaker john boehner and representative pelosi on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all of the services that we have end up having cracks that they are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you need to step back and ask -- are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? now we have the institute of medicine report to think. 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? 30% of the medications that we describe? the procedures? this is something that is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. healthcare industry. dr. marty makary on his book " unaccountable." on c-span 2. >> it is estimated that it would cost -- [indiscernible] [bells ringing] >> i chose to honor both. the sacrifice of american se
we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we look at the data, and in our market the security based market most transactions involve a party that isn't in the u.s.. so this is a cross border market. and how you do the cross border roles is how you do title seven. and so, we felt under those circumstances that when you are looking at the whole, it was important to take a holistic approach the cross border rules and because it was such a significant, had such a significant impact on how they were going to work that we needed to do a formal rulemaking. >> to mr. cook, thank you. i know i am out of time. i'm comfortable with what mr. cook is doing because of the data that you're going to collect. mr. gensler, it makes me a little nervous and particularly because of the different approaches. you know, and there are so many other questions i want to get to. b
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
they canceled their plans to meet for a holiday celebration in new york city, every single one of them came home instead. >> we've all been such good friends such a long time. we all grew up here. and it's so close-knit, this community. everyone kind of has each other's backs and does whatever it can to help each other out. >> we will be leaving newtown to give this small town its streets back. for the residents here to grieve and share together. but we're not going to stop covering this or talking about it in honor of those who died to make those in power take action to stop anything like this from happening again. "piers morgan starts now." >>> tonight, two more funerals, two more impossibly small coffins what will america do to stop a madman. >> i am a supporter of the second amendment. but i believe it's time for us to move a different direction. >> and the congresswoman who lost her husband in the long island railroad shooting. >>> also, i'll go one-on-one with a gun advocate who said that lawmakers who vote for gun control have blood on their hands. could he be serious? >
is a prevention bill. but i'm ginned this evening by congresswoman yvette clarke of new york who has long been an advocate for ending the gun violence in our communities and providing the kinds of assistance, both intervention and prevention, that we need in so many communities around this country. she's been a leader of so many issues. i'd like to yield her such time as she might consume. ms. clarke: i thank my colleague for yielding. madam speaker, i've joined my colleague, dr. donna christensen, representative of the virgin islands here tonight new york remembrance of the 20 -- 20 first grade children and six educators who were mercilessly gunned down last friday at the sandy hook elementary school. innocent victims of senseless gun violence. to the families, educators and community of newtown, connecticut, on behalf of the people of the 11th congressional district of brooklyn, new york, i wish to express my most profound and deepest condolences. i believe like so many across this nation that the families of these victims, the families of children in every community in the united states hav
, puerto ricans in new york and chicago who are very liberal, but we're starting to see the rise of foreign-born latinos and their children who tend to be more conservative. i mean, just look at the pew numbers. on abortion still the majority believe that abortion should be legal compared to about 40% of the rest of the population. marriage, that is shifting. it has certainly shifted in the past five years, but there's still a good chunk of that electorate that is very conservative when it comes to, to marriage. the question is with social issues is not are you going to scare voters away. we believe that those who vote exclusively for those issues are going to vote, are mostly religious people who are going to vote for the candidate who has the traditional positions. nobody's not going to vote against the candidate because of their position of marriage within the latino community. >> right. it's scary to me because it is a place where we're not looking, again, we're not looking to the future. as a republican, we're counting on the older ones and not looking to how the vote is going to chang
monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." we are live from the new york stock exchange. let's take a look at the u.s. futures set up for the open first of the week. dow looking at about 50 points right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionai
this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on tuesday, day before yesterday, the senior senator from maine, olympia snowe, urged house republican leaders to end the suspense for middle-class taxpayers. "they shouldn't have to wonder whether we will ultimately raise taxes on low- to middle-income people." i assure them we won't raise taxes on the middle class on the poor, is what ow olympia snowe said. yesterday it seemed every practical republican left in washington was suddenly willing to say out loud what we have known for weeks: the only remaining option is for the house to pass the senate bill. dozens of house republicans signed onto a letter urging speaker boehner to take the last hexit before the cliff. neither president obama nor democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous about
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
, there was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. an immigrant bought it. he said i will figure out some way to use it. seven years later, he created a company that has hired 1500 employees and will do $1 billion of sales. it is the number one yogurt brand. seven years ago, it was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. the impact more broadly is pretty significant. >> you talk about how countries around the world are trying to copy that secret sauce of america's innovative society. do any of you see any indication that the united states' appeal, from its great research universities or to people who want to start companies, that the united states has lost any of this appeal? >> absolutely. the university may be different, but as it relates to the entrepreneur ship and creating companies, absolutely. that is not to say that we do not have a lot of things going for us. to suggest that there is not robust entrepreneurial ecosystem developing in many different countries is just not accurate. one fact that should be scary is that there is a venture firm, xcel partners, that back facebook -- all of their ve
is banning the cuts in new york city. so that and we are talking about, that ideology on the left, the progressive ideology. swatter some of the mifsud are commonly held by today's progress of squawks i've got about five myths that we tend to focus on the first to because those are the big juicy ideas and the bad ideas one is the natural things are good and number two, on the natural things are bad. number three, unchecked science will destroy us. number four, science is only relative any way, and number five, science is on our side. okay. the first one we learn all about them there. we are going to talk mostly about the most famous progressive today, president barack obama and his resume when it comes to science, but just to give you an idea about why these are important, natural things are good. that's behind the organic food movement. the rejection of the organic the modified to. unnatural things are bad. that is the fear of chemical and bpa, the fear of chemistry and the things that are unnatural and pesticides, fertilizers, unchecked science will destroy us and that is the nu
that before you drive a car. >> guest: you don't have to in my places. >>> former "new york times" editor on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. "living with guns the liberal's case." saturday night 10:00 eastern. new a few e moments a discussion on global counterterrorism. about an hour and a half. the hear -- u.s. ambassador to china on the relationship between got countries. then war tribute to the senator daniel inouye and connecticut senators joe -- school shooting in newtown. the senate banking subcommittee on financial institutions is holding a hearing tomorrow morning on consumer credit reports. this is representative of the consumer financial protection bureau testifying about oversight of the credit reporting market. you can see live on c-span3 at 10:00 eastern. now a discussion on global counterterrorism. u.s. relations with pakistan and status of al qaeda. from the brookings constitution. it's a little less than an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] good morning, thank you for your patience. my name is daniel -- i'm the research -- [inaudible] at t
and get some of the bad news. a team that is really fun to watch is the new york jets. coach ryan has a problem. he has three quarterbacks, sanchez, tim tebow, and a guy by the name of mcelroy. he cannot decide who their quarterback is going to be. that is the same problem the republicans are having. romney is gone, but he still in the background. we have mcconnell and we have the honor. who is the quarterback, mr. president? -- we have mcconnell and we have boehner. who is the quarterback, mr. president? we just had an election. the people overwhelmingly know why we have this debt. the polling right before the election showed that the vast majority of the american people realize that the debt was caused by george bush. that is a fact. mr. president, we have another judge report coming out tomorrow here we have a little problem because of what happened with hurricane sandy. but we will still have about 100,000 new jobs. we are approaching about 4 million jobs now that have been created. that does not merely make up for what was lost during the bush years, but we are making progress. p
that number continue to grow. christine romans, cnn, new york. >>> danny boston is with me now. he is an economist professor at georgia tech. he predicted this, right? everybody else thought it was dismal. you have been the ocht mist for many, many months now. why did this catch so many people off guard? >> if you look at homes, if you look at the housing sector that's coming back, and then retail sales using the holiday season were very strong. 5.8% in store fronts and 20% on-line sales. there's a lot of strength there, and economists have thought that hurricane sandy would have an adverse affect, and it hurt some, but there's so much going on that the economy -- >> is it possible we haven't seen the full impact of hurricane sandy, that we still might see some of those jobs lost, and it just hasn't been the numbers have not caught up to it yet to the reality? >> absolutely right. we do have to wait another month to get the full picture of it, but it was interesting that we saw initial claims for unemployment compensation initially spiked up right after sandy, and then they began t
was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white house, tuesday evening on c- span. >> george will spoke at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion in politics. the speech was hosted by the john danforth center on politics. we will hear from former senator john danforth, just before mr. will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he gr
officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: madam president, we saw what happened here, the minority leader filibustering his own bill. he should have trusted his first instincts. imagine if we would have passed the minority leader's resolution. the markets would have been jubilant. stocks would have gone up. one of the great specters hanging over our economy that we wouldn't raise the debt ceiling would have greatly mitigated in terms of damage and danger, and we could move on to the real issues of dealing with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as
. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rates products at morgan stanley. the probe is aimed at establishing whether hadden's late trades hat manipulate closing prices and made other trades more profitable. also singapore airline says that it is in talks with interested parties to sell its 49% stake in virgin atlantic. delta is reportedly among the potential suit ors. delta is said to want to gain access on injury gain's landing rights at london heathrow. >> biggest international hub h around. i think an dwderson is really g. it's profitable and we had the story about the older jets. just if you have financial flexibility, you can do things like this.
new york, the bipartisan safer act, companion bill with the bipartisan bill in the senate by senator cornyn and senator bennett. the safer act does a lot of good things but basically it allows funding to go and -- so that we make sure we test these cases. it audits these backlogs so we know where these cases are that are sitting on the shelves. it does the audit. it brings funding and brings these cases to justice so that we can make sure that these victims of crime have their day in court as well. d.n.a. is a wonderful thing, and it's important that we make sure that evidence is available for law enforcement, for prosecutors and judges in the courtroom. she was a child, lavenia was a child when she was sexually assaulted. that was a long time ago, but there are 400,000 cases waiting to be tested. this is something we can do in a bipartisan way today to test those cases, to bring justice to the victims of crime and make sure those outlaws get their day in court as well and be held accountable for the rape of children in our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the sp
in the "new york times," and the tax policy institute, which is certainly not a right of center institution, i think it would be slightly left of center, at least center -- if you cap deductions at $50,000 it generates $750 billion over 10 years. if you do the chain cpi, which i think mark has embraced. >> do you include charitables in that camp? >> you can include charitables, or you can also look at the health-care exclusion, which by the way is the most massive that exists. i do not know why people in the income categories that mark and i are in and now tim with his big budget job -- i do not know. >> bob, i hate to tell you, he is in a higher category than you. [laughter] >> they will publish that soon, i am sure. i do not know why we should continue to have the benefit of our health care plans coming to us in a tax-free way. there are all kinds of ways of looking at it. i do realize that to do real tax reform takes time, but i think we could go ahead and do some things. for instance, the $50,000 exclusion -- i realize that has been a non starter so far. i actually think we will end up wit
piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or do you mean days? and more broad, as you pointed out at the outset, the then studied peacefully but later on we saw international forces get involved and the europeans and the gulf arabs what mechanisms do you foresee for the future of serious of the interest of the syrian people do not get overwhelmed by the interest of these outside forces. the direction of the events on the ground, the direction is very clear when the d
unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highest level of weeks allowed right now because of their differing unemployment rates. guest: it is administered by states. i think a lot of the state programs are too restrictive in their eligibility and have to look capps. there are some important steps forward in the american recovery act -- too low caps. there are some important steps forward and the american recovery act. i do not see a lot of prospects for much greater federal involvement any time soon. host: mableton, illinois on the line for independents. caller: i want to direct this to mr. tanner. i have never been in debt. i have a retirement, have a very nice pension from the state of california bar when i was a state police officer. -- for when i was a state police officer. we're not putting enough emphasis on what has happened in the last 10 years, seven trillion dollars t 6o de dollars trillion and we lost in pensions. --7 dollars trillion to $60 trillion that we lost in pensions. what would you do? how long do you think it should take to get out of this mess that th
comparable area, new york to london, fax county to oxford, any comparable count, the united states with any comparable county, in europe or most parts of asia, you will find a tremendous difference between gun crimes and those gun crimes are not only associated with massive and unrestricted gun ownership but are caused by -- take another country, for example, israel, where obviously people need to have guns, there's terrorism. and there's almost no gun crime at all. in order to get a gun in israel, you have to have a 60-day waiting period. you have to take a mental health exam. you got to go to shooting ranges and pass a test. you can only get 50 bullets and that's a lifetime supply. there are enormous restrictions in that country that obviously needs a law. it's cultural, it's that part of the culture is caring more about winning over our children than >> what i find extraordinary is the callousness of politicians in america. i don't understand why some of them aren't prepared to literally stick their necks out and say, i've had enough of this. there are so few of them prepared to take any
metropolitan of boston, new york, l.a., and as a consequence of that, it can win elections but it always has difficulty enforcing the elections. it is somewhat ironic that party fell apart because of the slavery crisis. it was responsible for the whole idea of expansion westward and it was the issue of slavery in that territories -- what will the state is in the territories be? it fell apart as a consequence of its fundamental basis of american expansion westward. the whigs and the republicans were more or less opposed to expansion because they saw the expansion of slavery. in 1930 and 1931, republicans in the midst of the depression may have made the economic slump worse by doubling down on the terrace and the gold standard -- to colors of their post civil war policy that proved successful in the past but that were of doubtful at the sea in the new circumstances prevailing after the great war. what do i mean by that? the gold standard and the tariff worked as long as america is an out liar in a european dominated system. this is true all the way up to world war one so that the european powe
, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think you get 60% or over 60% reimbursement from the feds. you get 50%. you get -- i think it's you. get 60%. i can't remember everybody's numbers. i tried to educate myself. and in new york, we only get 50%. it makes a big difference. pam moynihan who always tried to change those formulas, ended up sake it's all james madison's fault. >> and we appreciate -- >> i think there are a couple of things that are terribly, terribly important and don't contradict anything that you all said. but we don't have a very good way of measuring the adequacy of our infrastructure. we know that the chinese spend eight times as high of percentage of their g.d.p. in infrastructure as we do in this country. and we know that that's got to make us less competitive. and i think i learned from the people at the chamber here that the cost of moving goods in the united states is greater in absolute dollars than it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you gr
, that probably would not affect you. if you live at new york, san francisco where your mortgage is more expensive, it would be easier to bump up against what the deduction cap would be. you might not be itemizing your tax returns at the end of every year. host: next call is mike on the democrat's line. are you there? caller: i have a question for you. i heard president obama is making cuts to medicare if his plan goes through. he wants to cut $400 billion in entitlements. i collect ssdi. i am disabled. these $40 billion cuts in entitlements, are they going to affect ssi, ssdi? guest: we do not know what the administration is talking about yet. that offer came from the administration on the hill yesterday. it was not specific. $400 billion is what we are looking at in entitlement savings and we're not sure if it is ssdi or how beneficiaries would be affected. host: children make up a lot of these credits. which of these are affected by the amount of children you have? guest: some of them do matter. the eitc, there was a law that allowed you to climate for more than three children. that could go aw
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